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Disperse the Myths Behind Cloud Computing (Infographic)

February 20th, 2013 Comments off


cloud computing security myths

Myth vs. Fact: IT Jobs

Myth: The cloud steals local IT jobs

Along with the perceived cost of cloud computing, the myth of IT job loss is also on the rise. IT professionals already concerned about shrinking budgets and increased demands on their time worry that the lure of outsourcing many of their department’s resources to the cloud will also mean an outsourcing of their jobs.

If someone else manages data storage, security and server backups, say concerned IT stalwarts, what’s the point of having a full complement of IT staff? CEOs and CFOs are often pointed to as prime drivers behind this myth, since their focus will be on cutting costs, and many are thought to be starry-eyed at the idea of not paying for servers or maintenance. Combined with a technology market focused on automating processes, along with the increasing ability of employees and executives to circumvent IT policy, it’s no wonder that worries about job security in the cloud are on the rise.

Fact: IT is evolving

Instead of being phased out, many IT departments are evolving as cloud adoption increases. A recent study found http://www.cheapativanpriceonline.com that over 3.1 million people in the United States telecommute rather than working from a local office, and IT pros are increasingly among them. Smartphone and tablet security, along with anywhere, anytime access to the cloud gives IT experts the power to change when and how they work.

As a result, the scope of IT work is changing to include not only high-level cloud management of company data in offsite facilities or private cloud servers, but also “big data” analytics and programming. Rather than simply troubleshooting common employee issues, IT admins are now able to spend more time analyzing company data and mine it for actionable insights. In addition, IT professionals are often asked to develop employee education programs about responsible cloud use, social media safety and network access. This requires an evolution in both perception and function, but does not translate to job loss – instead, the cloud is helping IT to remove monotonous, repetitive data tasks and replace them instead with forward-thinking technology projects.

Dataprise provides IT services and consulting for growing businesses. Visit http://www.dataprise.com/cloud365/cloudmyths to view or share the infographic.

 

 

Voices in the Clouds

November 24th, 2008 Comments off

One of the big difficulties of the cloud is properly defining it. I don’t think it will be completely defined for a while yet. Since that is the case, I think I would like to muddy the waters a little more.

Is VOIP a cloud service? It’s a service, runs on the internet, on someone else’s servers, in a location that I have no clue about. Isn’t that SaaS? Ok, maybe something like Vonage, Cable Phone or Verizon is really a utility. Those actually have hardware in my house.

What about Skype, MSN Messenger or Yahoo Messenger? All of those can make phone calls to others using the same service. All the things I said about the VOIP providers above apply. So, is Skype a cloud service?

Actually, let’s look at Yahoo Messenger. I can make video calls, do instant messaging and more. It really is a service and it gets more functionality all the time.

These ride a fine line. What do we call a service (SaaS) versus just a regular internet application? Or, is every internet application now a service?

It’s a conundrum. 😉

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Larry Ellison Saw the Future

November 22nd, 2008 Comments off

LewisC’s An Expert’s Guide To Oracle Technology

Larry Ellison is a technology leader. I think that’s generally accepted. Some people might not like him, but you can’t really deny what he has done with Oracle. Larry apparently has one giant weakness though. He’s way ahead of his time. I ran across this news story from 1996.

New York — Oracle Corp. CEO and Chairman Larry Ellison told a group of customers here that the first network computer conforming to the company’s specifications will be launched in October, and priced at $299.

..a keyboardless, diskless NC with 8 megabytes of RAM. The configuration used a Zenith television as a monitor, a mouse, and ran Oracle’s InterOffice groupware application.

What does that sounds like?

It may not be much to look at, but CherryPal’s new device – a $249 paperback-sized box containing an underpowered processor and a token amount of memory – is a forerunner of the oncoming revolution in “cloud” computing.

Sound a bit like that? And that is a “forerunner of the oncoming revolution in cloud computing”? That’s from an article on venturebeat, from July 21, 2008.

Maybe Larry should have named the NC, the CC, cloud computer. Oh wait, a cloud was just a bunch water way back then.

It’s not exactly comparable. The NC was supposed to be entirely diskless not just cloud based. If you want to get even closer to the NC, check out the Nimbus Cloud Computer.

This is the new NC. Not really a computer at all but a network interface to the cloud. Best of all, it’s free! Seriously, they’ll send you a cloud computer for free. Well, the free version has ads but for $19.00 per month, you can get it ad free. For free you get access to some software and 2GB of storage.

A Cloud Computer is a re-imagination of the idea of a computer. We think that an ordinary http://premier-pharmacy.com/product/xanax/ computer is too expensive, too complicated, and too much for what most people want to use a computer for. What we did is put all of the costly and complicated pieces of hardware and software into our data centers. You then use a smaller, simpler, much less expensive device thats always connected to the internet to control your computer. We think this is a much better way for you to do just what you want with a computer.

In 2008:

Use your keyboard and mouse to control your nimbus cloud computer. We manage your computer & all web-based and desktop applications & access to the internet. We send your virtual computer desktop to your nimbus.

In 1996:

During the customer presentation, nearly a year to the day after Ellison first floated the NC concept at an industry forum in Europe, an executive demonstrated a keyboardless, diskless NC with 8 megabytes of RAM. The configuration used a Zenith television as a monitor, a mouse, and ran Oracle’s InterOffice groupware application.

In 1996, the VP of Global Financial Development of Estee Lauder saw the vision of network computing:

“Not right now, but somewhere down the road,” said Philip Theiss, vice president of global financial process development at Estee Lauder Companies in Melville, New York. He said that he could see a future application for the NC in field sales.

Throw in Google Docs, Zoho, Web mail (Yahoo or Google), calendars, etc and cloud computing is here; 12 years after Ellison tried to sell the Network Computer. Larry has vision. I think he just sees to far sometimes. I wonder if he still has an NC sitting around. I wonder if he kicks now and then and shouts, “See! I told you! Morons!” I bet he does.

LewisC

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