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Fears About The Cloud: Education And Security

March 22nd, 2013 Comments off

In today’s fast-moving world of technological advancement, we are entrusting more and more of our precious data to systems that we might not have a thorough understanding of. Cloud computing is one such convenience that, while revolutionizing the way we store digital information, is also raising some eyebrows when it comes to security. The key to assuaging fears about security in the cloud is education. Read on to learn more:

Security concerns. Many people mistakenly believe that their data stored in the cloud is somehow less secure than the data that is stored elsewhere on their computers or in the Internet. That is simply not true. However, what is true is that cloud security requires its own set of specific considerations, some that are not as pertinent to other forms of storage. When it comes to ensuring data security in the cloud, there are some common concerns that need to be addressed: data encryption, verifiable security checks through the provider, and sensitive data privacy are at the top of the list.

Shared responsibility. There are three types of cloud hosting: Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS). One thing that all three of these hosting service types have in common is that they all require a shared responsibility between them and you when it comes to the security of your data, in varying ratios. For example, SaaS cloud hosting assumes the majority of the security responsibility, while requiring the least from the end user, and IaaS cloud hosting puts the majority of the security responsibility on the user. However you cut it, though, you cannot escape the need to seriously consider your data’s security, no matter where or how it is stored in the cloud.

How you can do your part to protect your cloud-stored data. The first, and most important, thing you can do is take time to thoroughly review the contractual and legal components of your agreement with your cloud hosting provider. This information is made available to you before you enter into a contract with a provider, and it is your responsibility to understand what your responsibilities are. Secondly, you should never just assume that your cloud hosting service is providing protection to your standard. If, in the contract, your provider commits to providing security measures, then you should ask what measures, specifically, are being used, and get proof.

As you can see, it is not enough to entrust cloud storage providers with the security of your data. You must take personal responsibility for that which is important to you, and that means taking proactive measures to ensure your information is safe in cloud storage.

About the Author: Sheryll Wickenhauser uses a disk and a cloud system for backing up her data. She prefers the Backblaze backup service and a separate hard disk she stores off-site for her business.

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Why Should Small Businesses Look at Cloud Computing Solutions?

March 5th, 2013 1 comment

 

Why Should Small Businesses Look at Cloud Computing Solutions?

The business world has seen several new advances in technology and has undergone many trends over the years. Whether it’s BYOD, social media explosion, or the Blackberry craze, there always seems to be something new in the world of business. Some of these trends last over time, and most are eventually phased out or replaced by something new. One innovation that seems to have taken over and is here to stay is Cloud Computing.

cloud_businessThere are a few different reasons why it’s fairly safe to assume that cloud computing will continue to be an integral part of the business world. For one, the advantages (which we’ll take a look at) are too good to be ignored. Unless there is some radical new technology that is released in the next decade, cloud computing won’t be knocked off any time soon. Also, cloud computing is still a relatively new technology. Cloud technology first became being offered as a service for businesses and consumers in 1999 by companies like Salesforce and Google. But it really hasn’t been until the past 5-10 years that companies and individuals really started to grasp what cloud computing is all about. What this means is there is still plenty of room for growth and development in the cloud computing industry.

Small businesses and even aspiring entrepreneurs need to seriously consider cloud computing and start taking advantage of all it has to offer.

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