Linux Access with SSH & PuTTY

Linux Access with SSH & PuTTY

SSH is an attempt (quite successful) to fix those insecurities without making things anymore complex than they need to be. SSH stands for Secure SHell. However, SSH is not really a command shell, it is rather a protocol that encrypts communications. That means that programs that use SSH can work like telnet or ftp but will be more secure.

Note: Technically, SSH is also a tool. There is a client terminal program called SSH. It’s a non-graphical command line tool that provides a window which executes a command shell on the remote system.

SSH offers multiple modes of connecting but for the purposes of AWS, we will talk about key based access. To make things more secure, EC2 uses a key based authentication. Before starting an instance, you need to create a key pair.

Note: The below explanation of SSH is a gross over simplification. I am just trying to give you a feel for what is going on. If you really want to understand the technical details, I really do recommend that you purchase a book. My personal recommendation is SSH, The Secure Shell: The Definitive Guide from O’Reilly.

When an instance starts up for the first time, EC2 copies the ssh key that you created to the proper directory on the remote server. The remote server will be running the SSH Server software.

You will then use an SSH client to connect to the server. The client will ask for some information proving that the server really is who it says it is. The first time you connect to a server, the client won’t have that information available so it will prompt you to vertify that the server is legitimate.

You verify that information by comparing a thumbprint. Verifying a host is a bit beyond this book but do an internet search for for “ssh host thumbprint”. You’ll find a variety of articles explaining it in detail.

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